Book Review for International Network for Theory of History

I have published my first book review for the International Network for Theory of History, based at Ghent University in Belgium. With this book review, I am taking yet another step in my endeavor to branch out into the sub-discipline of historiography, while at the same time continuing as an interdisciplinary historian with an interest in archaeology.

Enjoy!

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

 

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The Swedish Academy Collapses. Two Additional Members Have Resigned

On April 13, 2018, I published the following post on Book Riot.

The Swedish Academy Collapses. Two Additional Members Have Resigned.

Nobelmedaljen

The internal collapse of the Swedish Academy is complete. What everyone feared would happen has happened, and it is even worse than expected.

As of yesterday, two more members of the Swedish Academy have resigned, leaving the prestigious institution paralyzed by its own bylaws.

If you would like to read the post in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

The Disintegration of the Swedish Academy: Is This the End for the Nobel Prize in Literature?

On April 10, 2018, I published the following post on Book Riot.

The Disintegration of the Swedish Academy: Is This the End for the Nobel Prize in Literature?

Stortorget_2

The Swedish Academy is disintegrating. In the wake of the #metoo movement having reached Sweden in the fall of 2017, the Swedish Academy has been shaken to its core, jeopardizing the continued existence of the 232 year-old institution.

Internationally, the Swedish Academy is mostly known for awarding the Noble Prize in Literature every year. But if the Swedish Academy falls apart, what will happen to one of the world’s most famous and prestigious literary awards?

If you wish to read the post in its entirety, click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

10 Things You Need to Know about the Sarajevo Haggadah

Passover is just around the corner, so on March 26, 2018, I published the following post on Book Riot.

10 Things You Need to Know about the Sarajevo Haggadah

Sarajevo Haggadah_Wikipedia

Page from the Sarajevo Haggadah. Notice the wine stains and handwritten doodles, which indicate that this haggadah has been in extensive use throughout the years. (Source: Wikipedia)

Every year on Passover Jewish families all over the world gather ’round to celebrate and commemorate the Exodus from Egypt. At the center of this annual celebration is taking turns reading from a book called a haggadah. The word haggadah comes from the Hebrew root HGD, which means “to tell,” which is exactly the purpose of the Passover celebration–to tell the story of the Jews’ liberation from slavery in Egypt, also known as the Exodus.

Because haggadot are not considered holy texts, but rather instruction materials, over time they have developed into beautiful artifacts of book art. And nowhere were such beautiful haggadots made as in the Spanish city of Barcelona during the Middle Ages. And of these Barcelona haggadots, few can compare to the wonder and splendor of a book today known as the Sarajevo Haggadah.

Here are ten things you need to know about the Sarajevo Haggadah.

If you wish to read the post in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

Marjory Stoneman Douglas, the Writer and Activist Who Changed the World

The day before the March for Our Lives, which took place in Washington D.C. and around the world on March 24, 2018, I published this post on Book Riot.

Marjory Stoneman Douglas, the Writer and Activist Who Changed the World.

Marjory_S_Douglas_Friends of the Everglades_Wikipedia

Marjory Stoneman Douglas (1890–1998). Photo: Friends of the Everglades (Wikipedia).

On February 14, 2018, a mass shooting was carried out at a high school in Florida, killing fourteen students and three members of the staff. The shooting catapulted two names into the national and international consciousness–Parkland, which is where the shooting took place, and Marjory Stoneman Douglas, after whom the high school is named.

In addition to the horrific death toll, this incident attracted further attention when the students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School took to the physical and virtual streets. The students turned into activists, giving voice to their frustration and anger over the current state of politics in Florida, as well as in the United States as a whole. And in doing so, they carried on the legacy of the woman whose name their high school bears–Marjory Stoneman Douglas.

If you wish to read the post in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

7 Books about Books that You Need to Read If You Love Books

On March 4, 2018 I published the following post on Book Riot.

7 Books about Books that You Need to Read If You Love Books

Pradeep Sebastian_Book Hunters of KatpadiGeraldine Brooks_People of the Book

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you love reading as well as books, then what better way to brighten up your life than delving into a really good book about books?

If you want to read the entire post, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

10 Things You Need to Know about Megilat Ester

On February 26, 2018 I published the following post on Book Riot.

10 Things You Need to Know about Megillat Ester.

Megilat Ester_BL Or 1047

Megilat Ester (BL Or. 1047)

Happy Purim!

Purim is a Jewish holiday based on the events in the biblical Book of Esther, which tells the story of how the Jewish woman Esther saved her people from extinction in the ancient Persian Empire. The exact age of this particular holiday is not known, but Purim has been celebrated since at least the second century C.E.

The Book of Esther is also known as Megilat Ester, which is Hebrew for the Scroll of Esther. Because of the importance of Esther’s story in the celebrations of Purim, the Book of Esther is written on a separate scroll which is read out loud as part of the Purim celebrations. The tradition to write the Book of Esther on a scroll dates back to c. 500 C.E.

If you wish to read the post in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.