Quirky History: A Hootenanny with Owls in Medieval Margins

On November 9, 2016, I published the following post on Quirk Books.

Quirky History: A Hootenanny With Owls in Medieval Margins

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It’s #wolwednesday, the day of the week when we celebrate the animal that #wolwednesday’s originator author Sam Sykes calls the most perfect creation in nature, the furious and ruthless feathered bag of wisdom and anger—the mighty wol. Or, as it it is known to the rest of the world, the owl.

We’d like to highlight this weekly day of celebration by taking a closer look at owls in medieval manuscripts. Because, as we all know, the owls are not what they seem.

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If you’d like to read the post in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

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Quirky History: Fantastical Beasts in Medieval Bestiaries

On November 18, 2016, I published the following post at Quirk Books.

Quirky History: Fantastical Beasts in Medieval Bestiaries

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The fictional universe of J.K. Rowling is filled with fantastical creatures, and no other movie takes better advantage of this than Fantastical Beasts and Where to Find Them, which opens in theaters today.

When creating her magical world, Rowling is tapping into a literary tradition that goes all the way back to the Middle Ages and the literary genre of the bestiary.

Bestiaries are books of animals, both real and fantastical, accompanied by a description and a Christian parable. Even though bestiaries peaked in popularity in the 13th century, they continue to influence us today. Especially when it comes to fantasy fiction.

If you’d like to read the entire post, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.