Catch Me on the Season Premiere of The Story of God with Morgan Freeman

Catch Me on The Story of God with Morgan Freeman | Erika Harlitz-Kern | The Boomerang

In October last year I flew to the Czech Republic and worked on an episode of The Story of God with Morgan Freeman. I spent a day at the Broumov Monastery, just south of the Czech-Polish border, filming an episode on the amazing medieval manuscript Codex Gigas, also known as the Devil’s Bible.

The episode I filmed has been chosen as the premiere episode of the third season of The Story of God by Morgan Freeman and will air on the NatGeo Channel on Tuesday March 5 9/8c. Check out the trailer for Season 3 and then set your DVR for Tuesday night (or be a little crazy, and do it old school, and actually sit down to watch the episode as it airs).

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

10 Things You Need to Know about the Ancient Library of Alexandria

On February 4, 2019, I published the following post on Book Riot.

10 Things You Need to Know about the Ancient Library of Alexandria.

Alexander the Great | 10 Things You Need to Know about the Ancient Library of Alexandria | The Boomerang

Alexander the Great, part of a mosaic, c. 100 BCE, Pompeii, Italy.

In 334 BCE, Alexander the Great set out to conquer the world. On his conquests, Alexander brought with him historians and geographers to document and spread the word about the different societies and cultures they encountered as they fought their way from Macedonia and Greece in the west to India in the east.

After his untimely death in 323 BCE, Alexander’s conquests helped usher in an era in Ancient history named Hellenism. Hellenism is the result of Greek-Macedonian culture blending with the societies of North Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia, and India. It is defined by vibrant artistic expressions, expanded philosophical horizons, and a constant search for new knowledge. No other institution illustrates the spirit of Hellenism better than the ancient library of Alexandria, Egypt.

Here are ten things you need to know about the ancient library of Alexandria.

If you wish to read the article in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

TTR: Are We Really Global Citizens? Cosmopolitanism and Its Myths.

On September 18, 2018, fellow historian Vanesa Galindo Rodriguez and myself gave a talk at FIU’s Tuesday Times Roundtable on cosmopolitanism throughout the centuries and today. The Tuesday Times Roundtable is part of FIU’s Global Learning Initiative and is organized in co-operation with The New York Times.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

How a Forgotten War Can Help Us Solve the Crisis in Syria

I am on Washington Post’s history blog Made by History today talking about how learning about the Thirty Years’ War (1618–1648) can help us better understand how to deal (or not to deal) with messy conflicts, such as, e.g., the civil war in Syria.

How A Forgotten War Can Help Us Solve the Crisis in Syria

If you would like to read the piece in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

50 Must-Read Books about Tudor England

On May 31, 2018 I published the following post on Book Riot.

50 Must-Read Books about Tudor England

50 Must-Read Books about Tudor England

Great Gate at Hampton Court Palace, London, England. Source: Wikipedia.

Tudor England. Undoubtedly one of the most intriguing historical time periods in European history. Books about Tudor England conjures images of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, Queen Elizabeth as Gloriana, the Spanish Armada, and last, but absolutely not least, William Shakespeare.

But as always, there is so much more to any historical time period and to any society of the past than a few infamous personalities and events. So, too, with Tudor England.

If you wish to read the post in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

Book Review for International Network for Theory of History

I have published my first book review for the International Network for Theory of History, based at Ghent University in Belgium. With this book review, I am taking yet another step in my endeavor to branch out into the sub-discipline of historiography, while at the same time continuing as an interdisciplinary historian with an interest in archaeology.

Enjoy!

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

 

The Disintegration of the Swedish Academy: Is This the End for the Nobel Prize in Literature?

On April 10, 2018, I published the following post on Book Riot.

The Disintegration of the Swedish Academy: Is This the End for the Nobel Prize in Literature?

Stortorget_2

The Swedish Academy is disintegrating. In the wake of the #metoo movement having reached Sweden in the fall of 2017, the Swedish Academy has been shaken to its core, jeopardizing the continued existence of the 232 year-old institution.

Internationally, the Swedish Academy is mostly known for awarding the Noble Prize in Literature every year. But if the Swedish Academy falls apart, what will happen to one of the world’s most famous and prestigious literary awards?

If you wish to read the post in its entirety, click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.