I’m on The Daily Beast again again.

On August 17, 2019, I published my third article for The Daily Beast. This one I am particularly excited about because it allowed me to delve deeper into the complexities of Viking society. Enjoy!

What the Alt-Right Gets Wrong about the Vikings.

What the Alt Right Gets Wrong About the Vikings | The Daily Beast | The Boomerang

Reconstructed Viking Age longhouse, Borg, Lofoten, Norway.

Viking Age Scandinavians were immigrants who traded with the Muslim world and embraced gender fluidity—everything the alt-right despises.

If you want to read the article in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

The Day that Obsessed Adolf Hitler.

I’m back on The Daily Beast. This time I am arguing in favor of why we need to pay attention to the Treaty of Versailles. Spoiler: It’s not all about Hitler.

Enjoy!

The Day that Obsessed Adolf Hitler.

The Day that Obsessed Hitler | The Boomerang | The Daily Beast

The signing of the Treaty of Versailles.

This summer marked the centennial of the signing of the Treaty of Versailles, on June 28, 1919. The treaty put a formal end to World War I, one of the deadliest military conflicts in history. Yet the anniversary went mostly unnoticed.

That’s a shame because the treaty’s contents, and the reaction that they caused, were essential to paving the way for the ascent of Adolf Hitler and the rise of fascism in Europe.

If you want to read the article in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

What’s Silver, Purple, and Very Well-Traveled?

I’m on Atlas Obscura!

Atlas Obscura is a publication that features stories about the wondrous in the world. Places, objects, events, customs and traditions. Anything out of the ordinary that is connected to a particular place.

I have wanted to publish something with them for a long time, and now I finally have. So please enjoy my first-ever article for Atlas Obscura. It has everything. Goths, Roman emperors, abdicated queens, disgraced noblemen, and a book that went missing for 1,000 years.

What’s Silver, Purple, and Very-Well Traveled?

Codex Argenteus | Silver Bible

Codex Argenteus, or Silver Bible at Carolina Rediviva, Uppsala, Sweden. Photo: Erika Harlitz-Kern.

Tucked into a far corner of the annex to the Carolina Rediviva, the main library at Sweden’s Uppsala University, a book sits alone behind bulletproof glass. You might think its remote placement indicates its minor significance. But look closer and you’ll see a work of visual splendor—a uniform script in silver and gold ink, written on purple parchment, as bright and vibrant as if it were brand new.

This is the Codex Argenteus, or Silver Bible. Created more than 1,500 years ago in northern Italy, it was commissioned by the ruler of a people long since vanished. But their lost language is preserved on the pages of the book before you.

Fittingly, the story of how this bible ended up on display at a Swedish university is as mysterious as the book is beautiful.

If you wish to read the entire article, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

I’m on The Week.

On June 10, 2019, I published the following article on The Week. I had so much fun writing this article. I could talk about runestones all day.

Viking Runestones Were the Original Tweets.

Runestones the First Tweets |The Week |The Boomerang

Runestone Sö 106. Source: Riksantikvarieämbetet/Swedish National Heritage Board.

In the remote Swedish countryside, a 1,000-year-old stone slab stands raised by the side of a road. Chiseled onto it, a message has been carved in runes — symbols that served as letters in the ancient Germanic alphabet. The runes tell onlookers that a man named Alrik commissioned and raised this stone slab in commemoration of his father, Spjut, a Viking famous for destroying and laying siege to fortifications in the west. Alrik basks in the glory of Spjut’s accomplishments: “Alrik raised the stone, son of Sigrid, after his father Spjut, he in the west had been, castle he had broken and conquered. The arts of the siege, he knew them all.”

Thousands of Viking Age runestones like this one dot the Swedish landscape, providing direct glimpses into the lives of the Vikings. The messages are short, self-expressive, and, for us onlookers, very out-of-context. More often than not, they contain the unsolicited opinions of the person who commissioned the stone. In many ways, these ancient dispatches are similar to another, more modern style of communication: tweets.

If you would like to read the article in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

I’m on The Daily Beast

On April 20, 2019, I published the following article on The Daily Beast.

Give the Notre Dame a Modern Roof the Alt-Right Will Hate.

Notre Dame fire_BBC
Photo: BBC.

If you wish to read the article, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

10 Things You Need to Know about the Ancient Library of Alexandria

On February 4, 2019, I published the following post on Book Riot.

10 Things You Need to Know about the Ancient Library of Alexandria.

Alexander the Great | 10 Things You Need to Know about the Ancient Library of Alexandria | The Boomerang

Alexander the Great, part of a mosaic, c. 100 BCE, Pompeii, Italy.

In 334 BCE, Alexander the Great set out to conquer the world. On his conquests, Alexander brought with him historians and geographers to document and spread the word about the different societies and cultures they encountered as they fought their way from Macedonia and Greece in the west to India in the east.

After his untimely death in 323 BCE, Alexander’s conquests helped usher in an era in Ancient history named Hellenism. Hellenism is the result of Greek-Macedonian culture blending with the societies of North Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia, and India. It is defined by vibrant artistic expressions, expanded philosophical horizons, and a constant search for new knowledge. No other institution illustrates the spirit of Hellenism better than the ancient library of Alexandria, Egypt.

Here are ten things you need to know about the ancient library of Alexandria.

If you wish to read the article in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

I’m on Goodreads

Last year I took the plunge and joined Goodreads. I’ve been searching for a way to keep track of my readings as well as writing short reviews, since I’ve noticed that doing both of these things helps me retain what I read to a higher degree. I’ve tried keeping book journals, writing about books here on The Boomerang, tweeting about books I’ve read, but nothing seemed to work out in the long run.

I joined Goodreads in July last year, and so far, it seems to be working out well. If you’d like to follow me on Goodreads, you can find me there under my full name.

Here’s a sample of the books I’ve read and reviewed on Goodreads. Hopefully it will help you find some new books and authors to read. Either way, I hope you enjoy the reviews.

Nnedi Okorafor, Binti: Home.

Eric Idle, Always Look on the Bright Side of Life. A Sortabiography.

Brian McClellan, Promise of Blood.

Aeschylus, Oresteia.

J.Y. Yang, The Black Tides of Heaven.

Eve MacDonald, Hannibal. A Hellenistic Life.

Myke Cole, The Queen of Crows.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.