50 Must-Read Books about Tudor England

On May 31, 2018 I published the following post on Book Riot.

50 Must-Read Books about Tudor England

50 Must-Read Books about Tudor England

Great Gate at Hampton Court Palace, London, England. Source: Wikipedia.

Tudor England. Undoubtedly one of the most intriguing historical time periods in European history. Books about Tudor England conjures images of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, Queen Elizabeth as Gloriana, the Spanish Armada, and last, but absolutely not least, William Shakespeare.

But as always, there is so much more to any historical time period and to any society of the past than a few infamous personalities and events. So, too, with Tudor England.

If you wish to read the post in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

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7 Books about Books that You Need to Read If You Love Books

On March 4, 2018 I published the following post on Book Riot.

7 Books about Books that You Need to Read If You Love Books

Pradeep Sebastian_Book Hunters of KatpadiGeraldine Brooks_People of the Book

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you love reading as well as books, then what better way to brighten up your life than delving into a really good book about books?

If you want to read the entire post, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

Book Review for Foreword Reviews

I have a new writing gig.

In addition to what I’m writing for Book Riot and Quirk Books, I am now also a book reviewer for Foreword Reviews. If you would like to read my first review for Foreword Reviews, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

When Your Favorite Fantasy Book Series Comes to an End

On January 18, I published the following post on Book Riot.

When Your Favorite Fantasy Book Series Comes to an End

“When the music’s over
Turn out the light.”
–The Doors

Two of my favorite fantasy book series have come to an end—N.K. Jemisin’s The Broken Earth Trilogy and Myke Cole’s The Reawakening Trilogy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is a little bit ironic that that both of these series ended at the same time, because I found Jemisin and Cole at the same time. A year and a half ago, I had reached a point where I felt unchallenged by what I’d been reading lately, so I went searching for new writers to discover. Through a combination of the serendipity that is the daily life of a Book Riot contributor and the chaos that is twitter, two names caught my attention.

N.K. Jemisin and Myke Cole.

A couple of sure-why-not-induced mouse clicks later, and their books were on the way to me in the mail.

The first book—or should I say books—by N.K. Jemisin I ever read was…

If you would like to read the article in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

100 Must-Read Books about the Middle Ages

On January 4, 2018, I published the following post on Book Riot.

100 Must-Read Books about the Middle Ages

The ideas we tend to have about the Middle Ages are mostly based on how the time period has been interpreted through fantasy fiction and games, and the romanticizing of the era by intellectuals, scholars, politicians, and artists in the nineteenth century.

These interpretations have given rise to of a view of the Middle Ages as an entirely Christian society in western Europe, populated only by white people, and with few influences coming from outside.

This view is inaccurate.

If you want to read the post in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

People of Color in the Middle Ages: A Primer to Promote Diversity in Fantasy

On February 6, 2017, I published the following post on Book Riot.

People of Color in the Middle Ages: A Primer to Promote Diversity in Fantasy

saint-maurice-18

St. Maurice

A recurring topic of debate within the SFF community is the issue of historical accuracy in medieval fantasy fiction. Claims are repeatedly made that there were no people of color in medieval Europe. Therefore, the argument goes, medieval fantasy fiction with all white, Christian characters is historically accurate. Any inclusion of people of color or other religions is a distortion of history in the name of political correctness.

In actual fact, medieval Europe was a complex society where several different cultures, religions, and linguistic groups coexisted under the umbrella of the omnipresent Catholic Church.

As Jonathan Hsy shows in his book…

If you’d like to read the post in its entirety, please click here.

Eurovision Song Contest. A Primer

On Saturday May 14, 2016, Ukraine won the Eurovision Song Contest for the second time. Their winning contribution was the song “1944” performed by Jamala.

This year the Eurovision was broadcast in the US for the first time in the contest’s sixty-year history. Leading up to the Eurovision I published the following introductory post about the contest on Book Riot.

Eurovision Song Contest. A Primer.

Eurovision 2016 logo

With over 200 million viewers, the Eurovision Song Contest is one of the largest TV events in the world, and on May 14 it will be broadcast in the US for the first time.

After sixty years the US will finally be treated to this wonderfully cheesy international music contest that claims to be all about the song but in actual fact is just as much about politics.

If you would like to read the post in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.