Interview for Geek Dad/Geek Mom on Racism and Diversity in Speculative Fiction

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St. Maurice

On April 11, 2017, I was interviewed by the blog Geek Dad/Geek Mom. We talked about racism and diversity in speculative fiction, about the state of the art in historical research, and how to locate trustworthy sources when you do your own historical research when writing speculative fiction.

And of course, I recommended some books. And referenced Stargate SG-1.

You can check out the interview here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

Quirky History: A Hootenanny with Owls in Medieval Margins

On November 9, 2016, I published the following post on Quirk Books.

Quirky History: A Hootenanny With Owls in Medieval Margins

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It’s #wolwednesday, the day of the week when we celebrate the animal that #wolwednesday’s originator author Sam Sykes calls the most perfect creation in nature, the furious and ruthless feathered bag of wisdom and anger—the mighty wol. Or, as it it is known to the rest of the world, the owl.

We’d like to highlight this weekly day of celebration by taking a closer look at owls in medieval manuscripts. Because, as we all know, the owls are not what they seem.

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If you’d like to read the post in its entirety, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

Quirky History: Fantastical Beasts in Medieval Bestiaries

On November 18, 2016, I published the following post at Quirk Books.

Quirky History: Fantastical Beasts in Medieval Bestiaries

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The fictional universe of J.K. Rowling is filled with fantastical creatures, and no other movie takes better advantage of this than Fantastical Beasts and Where to Find Them, which opens in theaters today.

When creating her magical world, Rowling is tapping into a literary tradition that goes all the way back to the Middle Ages and the literary genre of the bestiary.

Bestiaries are books of animals, both real and fantastical, accompanied by a description and a Christian parable. Even though bestiaries peaked in popularity in the 13th century, they continue to influence us today. Especially when it comes to fantasy fiction.

If you’d like to read the entire post, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

10 Things You Should Know about the Exeter Book

On August 3, 2016, I published the following post on Book Riot.

10 Things You Need to Know about the Exeter Book

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Did you think that English literature began with Beowulf?

Think again.

The book that is considered the beginning of English literature is a medieval manuscript known as the Exeter Book. The Exeter Book contains religious and secular poems, placed side by side with riddles written in double entendres that will make you blush.

Here are ten things you should know about the Exeter Book.

If you would like to read the entire post, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

10 Things You Should Know about the Gutenberg Bible

On July 13, 2016, I published the following post on Book Riot.

10 Things You Should Know about the Gutenberg Bible

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The invention of the internet has ushered in the digital age and revolutionized how we access and share information. But this change in how we distribute information is not the first of its kind to have taken place.

Five hundred and sixty-one years ago a man in Germany invented a new kind of printing press.

This printing press sparked a revolution in the distribution of information in medieval Europe.

If you wish to read the entire post, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

10 Things You Should Know about the Book of Kells

On November 5, 2015, I published the following post on Book Riot.

10 Things You Should Know about the Book of Kells

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Arguably the most famous artifact on display in Dublin is the Book of Kells at Trinity College. You simply can’t travel to the capital of Ireland without the Book of Kells being mentioned. And rightfully so. Together with the Gospels of Lindisfarne and the Book of Durrow, I would say that the Book of Kells is one of the greatest contributions to medieval art ever to come out of the British Isles.

Here are ten things you should know about the Book of Kells.

If you would like to read the rest of this post, please click here.

In the words of my friend, the Australian, I shall return.

Why Are These Knights Battling Snails?

On August 28, 2015, I published the following post at Quirk Books.

Quirky Books in History: Why Are These Knights Battling Snails?

191i6h6497x81jpgMedieval manuscripts are known for their beautiful illumination, aka the imaginative and colorful illustration inside letters or in the margin. But have you ever taken a closer look at what these illustrations actually depict? There can be some bizarre-looking stuff happening in these pages. This ain’t your typical Renaissance Fair fair.

If you would like to read the rest of the article, please click here.